Foldio1a-3

Foldio 2 Table Top Photo Studio Review

November 6, 2015 , In: Business Tips, Studio
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A few weeks ago, AJE team member, Diana P., mentioned that she was replacing her Foldio 1 with the larger Foldio 2.  I was like, “What in the heck is a Foldio?”

I learned that a Foldio is a portable light studio or light box (see picture above), available through Photojojo.  I did a little research and bought the larger Foldio 2 right away.  I already had a very good light box by E-Z Cube (see picture below), but it takes up a lot of space and we expect to be moving to a smaller home in January.

 

The Foldio has several innovative characteristics that are not to be found in a standard light box. As the name implies, if folds up easily and compactly.  My E-Z Cube folds up too, in principal, but its like wrestling with bed springs.  You have to twist it a certain way (that I never mastered), while pressing down, and then fold in the sides and slide it into a nylon bag, before it springs open again, like a Jack-In-A-Box.   Needless to say, it was just easier to leave my  E-Z Cube open at all times.

The Foldio is made of lightweight, corrugated plastic which unfolds into a cube shape with one open end. The sides of the cube overlap in the the same way as the folds on the
bottom of an envelope do.  Each side is held in place by three powerful
magnets.  If you look at the photo below  you can see the faint outline of the magnets on each tab. Pull the magnets apart and the cube folds flat in seconds.

 Because it folds up so easily,  I can simply fold it up and
store it in the closet or on a bookshelf if I have guests over or if I need more working space.

 

 The Foldio lighting system is also innovative..  Both the Foldio 1 and 2 come with streamlined, inbuilt LED lighting.  The lights on the Foldio 1 run on batteries, so you can use it outdoors or anywhere, without requiring electricity – it is entirely portable in this sense.  The Foldio 2 is larger and has 2 rows of lights that run on electricity.  I turned my Foldio on its side, in the picture below, so I could photograph the 2 rows of tiny LED lights.  The round knobs on the right can dim or brighten the lights.  I love that feature!

My E-Z Cube (and every other light box system I’ve heard of) has separate lights, which are quite expensive. I couldn’t afford the lights offered by the E-Z Cube company and so I
jerry-rigged shop lights with high wattage daylight bulbs. My shop lights worked well, but they took up a lot of space.   My E-Z Cube and lights took up the entire top of bedroom dresser that you see in the first picture.

Since the lights on the Foldio are built in, they don’t take up any extra room at all.  I love the extra space that I’ve gained on my dresser top, but I have to say that the Foldio lights are a mixed blessing.  The space savings and that fact that you can adjust the light intensity are big pluses! However, because the lights are built in at the top of the box, it is difficult to avoid casting shadows on the product item you are photographing.  With free-standing lights, you can set one on either side of the cube, which reduces shadows, plus you can move them around to adjust the angles of the lights.  With the Foldio, the lights are always up above and if you try to shoot downward, from above your product, your hand and camera will cast a shadow.  You can work around this, but I find it annoying.  If you decide to get a Foldio, I suggest lowering your camera to the height of the product you are photographing and then shoot straight at it.  If you want to take a shot from above,  hold the camera outside of the box (so your hands are not below the lights) and then use your zoom to get in closer.

 In summary, I think the Foldio, although not perfect, is going to meet my needs at the moment. It is perfect for someone with limited space and/or a limited budget.  I think the EZ Cube plus lights or a similar arrangement from another company, is a better option for the professional or someone with the necessary space.

~Linda
Linda Landig Jewelry
  

Linda Landig

Linda Landig has been designing jewelry for over 30 years. Color play is the driving force in her work, closely followed by an obsession with texture. Linda soon discovered that art beads could provide much of the color and texture she sought. Linda has an affinity for floral themes, dating back to childhood efforts to raise irises. She has taken courses in metalsmithing and lampwork, but it is ceramics that has captured her heart. Linda has two adult children and lives in Olympia, WA with her husband of 42 years.
  1. Reply

    How about making a hole in the top of the box to put your camera lense through so that you are not obstructing the lights?

    Linda x

  2. Reply

    Great review Linda! I too have the E-Z cube and it sits on the end of my workbench taking up space. It has worked best for me when there's been bright sunlight, but that's not always possible. I've not been happy with the light set up nor getting enough light inside to shine on my jewelry. I'm going to consider this next spring. Do you find it lets in more light than the E-Z cube?

    • Reply

      I'm not sure if it lets in more light, I imagine it is about the same as an E-Z cube in that respect. But because it has its own built in lights, it will never be too dark.

  3. Reply

    I have the Foldio 1 and am interested that there is a larger version. The first version is very good for smaller pieces and beads, but it's often a bit small for longer necklaces. I've also found that lately I am getting some grainy pictures. It seems to help if I turn off other lights in the room and only have the Foldio lights on. I know next to nothing about photography, so I don't know why that would be, but thought I'd mention it in case it is helpful to someone. Thanks for this post!

  4. Reply

    I too have found more success with room lights off.

  5. Reply

    I have been looking at Foldio too and was wondering if it will work for shooting mix media jewelry that has resin on it – which is quite difficult to photograph because of the light glare; particularly when the lights are above

    • Reply

      That's a good question, but I really don't know. I have thought of covering the lights with tissue or tracing paper to reduce the glare and shadows, but I haven't tried it yet.

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